Geological Investigation of CO2 Storage and Innovative Research for CO2 Monitoring Technology > Petroleum & Marine Research > R&D Activities > KOREA INSTITUTE OF GEOSCIENCE AND MINERAL RESOURCES
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KOREA INSTITUTE OF GEOSCIENCE AND MINERAL RESOURCES
THE WORLD'S LEADING RESEARCH
INSTITUTE OF GEOSCIENCE

R&D Activities

Vision & Mission Organization MOU Status Brochure KIGAM GUIDE

GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND INNOVATIVE RESEARCH FOR CO2 MONITORING TECHNOLOGY

Research activities have focused on 1) the development of in-situ CO2 monitoring technology with laboratory experiments as well as a small-scale test bed, 2) estimations of potential CO2 storage capacities for saline formations in the continental shelf area, 3) CO2 -water-rock interaction experiments and two-phase (CO2 and brine) flow visualization under various reservoir conditions, and 4) distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) development using fiber-optic cable for measurements of CO2 behaviors in subsurface environments. Recent results are summarized below.


  • - Estimation of the CO2 storage capacities of deep saline formations in the West Sea (Fig. 1) and of sub-basalt formations in the South Sea (Fig. 2)
  • - Development of a DOFS (distributed optical fiber sensing) seismic data acquisition system and directional vibration sensing technology (Fig. 3)
  • - Evaluation of the CO2 capillary trapping capacity for a highly heterogeneous storage formation (Fig. 4)
  • - Modelling and analysis of CO2 -water-rock interactions in basaltic tuff
  • Fig. 1. Result of a basin-scale CO2 storage capacity analysis. The east sub-basin is the best prospective area in terms of its storage capacity and proximity to a power plant. Fig. 1. Result of a basin-scale CO2 storage capacity analysis. The east sub-basin is the best prospective area in terms of its storage capacity and proximity to a power plant.


    Fig. 2. Offshore distribution of basaltic rocks, which are potential CO2 storage formations for future use. Fig. 2. Offshore distribution of basaltic rocks, which are potential CO2 storage formations for future use.


    Fig. 3. Field testing of a 3C fiber sensor package and directional decomposition. Fig. 3. Field testing of a 3C fiber sensor package and directional decomposition.


    Fig. 4. Two-phase (CO2 and brine) flow visualization for highly heterogeneous rock and measurements of CO2 capillary trapping capacities. Fig. 4. Two-phase (CO2 and brine) flow visualization for highly heterogeneous rock and measurements of CO2 capillary trapping capacities.


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